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30 states allow kWh pricing, but non-Tesla EV drivers mostly miss benefits | Electrek

North Carolina is now the 30th state to allow public EV charging companies to offer pricing by the kilowatt-hour (kWh), instead of charging per minute. The change was thanks to bipartisan legislation — House Bill 329, Renewable Energy Amendments — passed by the legislature and signed by Gov. Roy Cooper.

The vast majority of Americans now live and drive in places where private companies are free to set up EV charging stations and offer pricing for actual kWh delivered to the vehicle. Tesla calls billing by the kWh “the most fair and simple method.” Any EV driver would agree, as all sorts of factors including the weather affect the speed an EV will charge at, making per-minute pricing something of a crapshoot as opposed to how many kWh (like ‘gallons of gas’) was actually delivered.

So why isn’t kWh pricing more common?
There are four major players in public EV charging in the US, with three different business models, but only Tesla has a stated preference for kWh pricing, which they list at $0.28 per kWh in the United States (but this seems to be a maximum, with some states paying less. Update: a user says they pay $0.30/kWh at an urban Tesla Supercharger in downtown Chicago. What do you pay? Comment below).

via 30 states allow kWh pricing, but non-Tesla EV drivers mostly miss benefits – Electrek.

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