California lawmaker withdraws bill to end ‘pink tax’ retail pricing disparity | Retail Dive

Dive Brief:
The so-called “pink tax” remains legal in California for the time being after a bill outlawing differential pricing based on gender was withdrawn by its sponsor, state Sen. Ben Hueso, a Democrat from San Diego, the Los Angeles Times reports.

California’s Assembly Judiciary Committe was expected to vote on the legislation Tuesday after the state Senate granted its approval in May. Retailers and manufactures had opposed the measure, with critics arguing that it put undue pressure on retailers to ensure that prices were equal. Opponents’ proposed amendments would have stripped the bill of its punitive powers and required consumers to demonstrate conclusive proof of discrimination, according to Richard Holober, executive director of the Consumer Federation of California, which sponsored the bill.

California already has laws on the books outlawing gender discrimination by businesses, including the 1959 Unruh Civil Rights Act, which requires businesses to grant “full and equal accommodations” to everyone regardless of race, sex, religion or national origin, as well as a 1995 law that outlaws the pricing of services based on gender. Hueso’s bill aimed to expand that law to include “goods.”

Read complete article here:

California lawmaker withdraws bill to end ‘pink tax’ retail pricing disparity | Retail Dive.