Is a taxi or Uber driver more likely to rip you off on the way to the airport? | MarketWatch

Uber drivers are not completely exempt from allegations that they’ve ripped off their passengers, however. The study found the drivers often seek out routes that are subject to surge pricing, Uber’s practice of increasing fares when there is high demand. They also occasionally tell the app that they’ve started a ride before a rider gets in the car, or a driver will keep driving without ending the trip within the app, research from Takahashi and RideGuru found.

Riders can flag that type of behavior in the app. Drivers also occasionally try to stretch rides by having long conversations or discreetly changing the route, Takahashi said. Another potential problem for consumers: Uber charging more for some routes arbitrarily. While Uber’s pricing is more transparent than taxis because they quote riders up front, that doesn’t always mean it’s consistent, said Harry Campbell, founder of The RideShare Guy.

“One alarming trend we’ve noticed with Uber lately is that they are now charging riders different rates for the exact same trip,” he said. “One of the nice things about taxis is that there is a flat rate structure that doesn’t go up or down but with Uber, their pricing algorithm is basically a black box and we don’t know what’s behind it.”

Uber told MarketWatch its systems respond to small changes in demand that can cause riders to see different prices, but customers always see the full rate before ordering a car. Lyft did not respond to a request for comment.

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Is a taxi or Uber driver more likely to rip you off on the way to the airport? – MarketWatch.