Mark Shenton’s Week: Dynamic ticket prices risks leaving angry patrons out of pocket | The Stage

It has long been the case when travelling by aeroplane, that you could be sitting beside someone who has paid half the price – and of course you will both arrive at your destination at the same time.

The exact same thing happens in the theatre, too, in which you could watch exactly the same show, with the same view, beside someone who has paid a very different price.

Of course the dynamic pricing model fluctuates: prices usually go up, but they can also go down. Earlier this month, I was in New York. We had been to Tuesday evening’s performance of Groundhog Day and returned for the Saturday matinee.

On leaving that show, we made straight for the box office to secure tickets for the final matinee the following day to see it one last time (and in my case the ninth). Even though this involved changing our flights.

The box office clerk told us she only had premium priced tickets available – and not three together. So we bought two tickets at $249 each in Row P of the stalls – and another single at $375 in Row H.

Read complete article here:

Mark Shenton’s Week: Dynamic ticket prices risks leaving angry patrons out of pocket.