Massive Price Hike for Lifesaving Opioid Overdose Antidote | Scientific American

Federal and state governments have spent millions of dollars equipping police officers and other first responders with naloxone. In communities particularly hard-hit by drug overdoses, places such as schools, libraries and coffee shops are keeping the antidote on hand. Physicians are prescribing it to patients who are taking prescription painkillers in an effort to make sure they—and their families and friends — are prepared.

The Evzio could be ideal, especially when medical professionals are not nearby, noted Traci Green, an associate professor at Boston University’s School of Medicine. But the price limits access.

“It’s a really good product,” she said. “It’s elegant. People do like it—but they can’t afford it.”

“There’s a lot of value to this formulation,” said Ravi Gupta, a medical student and lead author of a December op-ed on the pricing issue, published in the New England Journal of Medicine. “But it’s not justified. This pricing is not justified.”

But consumers may not yet be pinched. In another Mylan parallel, Kaleo offers coupons to patients with private insurance, so they don’t have any co-pay when they pick up the device.

So Kaleo would say the price hikes are essentially moot. Herzog said they are necessary to subsidize programs that do not offer copayments. In a follow-up email, he added that the list price is “not a true gauge,” because insurance companies can sometimes negotiate rebates and discounts. And, he said, since the price increase, more patients have gotten Evzio prescriptions filled—so the cost doesn’t seem to be stopping them.

Mylan provides a similar Epi-Pen discount—a move that’s helped cement it as the dominant epinephrine provider. But even if consumers don’t directly pay for the price increases, they’re affected, analysts cautioned.

“When you have these kinds of programs, the cost is still borne by patients, because insurance premiums go up,” Beletsky said.

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Massive Price Hike for Lifesaving Opioid Overdose Antidote – Scientific American.