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Transportation officials give “dynamic tolling” a stab at improving Colorado’s worsening traffic problem along U.S. 36, I-25 | The Denver Post

On Wednesday, the CDOT tolling authority board voted to begin a trial run of new roadway technology to monitor road conditions on U.S. 36 and a small portion of I-25 in downtown Denver starting this fall, with the hopes that it will get a permanent nod by 2020.

Dynamic tolling, which will be used alongside free general-purpose lanes, employs sensors and other measuring devices to gauge how much traffic is on the road at any given time and at what speed it is moving. If the system detects a slowdown in the managed lane, tolls go up to dissuade drivers from making the situation worse. When the managed lanes are moving freely, tolls decrease.

Drivers are alerted to the price of using the managed lane by overhead signs before they enter the lane.

Advocates say it’s a more precise congestion-management approach than what is in place now in the managed lanes between Denver and Boulder, where toll rates are set according to the time of day (rush hour versus off-peak travel periods, for example). They say rates people pay under the new system will be similar for the most part to what drivers pay now, with the current cap of $15.76 on a one-way trip for those using transponders, and $23.64 for those charged by license plate number, remaining in effect.

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Transportation officials give “dynamic tolling” a stab at improving Colorado’s worsening traffic problem along U.S. 36, I-25.

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