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How smart congestion pricing will benefit New Yorkers | EDF

Last week, New York became the first American city to adopt congestion pricing—a move that should benefit both the city’s crumbling transit system and the environment.

In highly dense areas such as lower Manhattan – where valuable road space is quite limited by its urban geography — congestion pricing allows for a better management for improving vehicle traffic flow. Since the 1950s, economists and transportation engineers have advocated for this market-based measure, which encourages drivers to consider the social cost of each trip by imposing an entrance fee to certain parts of cities—in this case, Manhattan below 60th street. These fees should both discourage driving, thus reducing traffic, while—in New York’s case—raising needed funds for the subway and city buses. These pricing plans have been successful in reducing congestion in places like Singapore and parts of Europe. They have provided additional social benefits, like reducing asthma attacks in children in Stockholm by almost half and cutting traffic accidents in London by 40 percent.

New York will formally introduce this policy instrument in 2021. And while many of the pricing decisions have been deferred, 80 percent of the revenue collected will go to the subway and bus network; 10 percent will go to New York’s commuter rail systems that serve the city. Those setting rates can look to existing pricing models and research to price for success.

Cristobal Ruiz-Tagle, an EDF High Meadows Fellow, spoke with Juan Pablo Montero – a leading environmental economist, fellow Chilean and member of our Economics Advisory Council – about his research on congestion pricing, and what New Yorkers can and should expect.

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How smart congestion pricing will benefit New Yorkers.

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